Cambridge Outdoors

playing, learning, and being outdoors in Cambridge, Mass.

Animals Unleashed at Magazine Beach

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Image © Bimal Nepal, BimalPhoto.com.

Several animal celebrities of the Cambridge Wildlife Puppetry Project (CWPP), whose activities are supported by the Cambridge Arts Council and the Massachusetts Cultural Council this year, visited picnicking families and others at Magazine Beach Park Friday for a Walk/Ride Day celebration. Stay tuned for the CWPP’s four-day Fly, Buzz, and Honk! wildlife festival, August 7–10, 2017, every day from 10:00 to 12:00 in Riverside Press Park. Art and games and performances at the festival highlight the species that live in our city.

Saturday’s Moth: National Moth Week 2017

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Common Looper Moth (Autographa precationis), photographed in Cambridge. Copyright (c) by Mark Rosenstein.

We continue our celebration of National Moth Week. All the images we’ve posted this week are of moths that live in Cambridge, and today’s Common Looper Moth is no exception.

Through Sunday, July 30th, you can see beautiful moths from near and far by searching the hashtag #nationalmothweek on Instagram and elsewhere—or better yet, by heading outdoors.

Friday’s Moth: National Moth Week 2017

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Nessus Sphinx Moth (Amphion floridensis), photographed in the city of Cambridge. Copyright (c) Mark Rosenstein.

Sphinx moths like this one are daytime pollinators.  It’s National Moth Week.

Gather your neighbors for a Cambridge “mothing” event.

Thursday’s Moth: National Moth Week 2017

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Grape Plume Moth, Geina periscelidactylus, photographed at Alewife Reservation, Cambridge. Photo (c) Mike Mulqueen. Used by permission.

Moths come in a variety of shapes, as this plume moth demonstrates. It’s National Moth Week. Find your own moth!  Here’s a guide  to attracting and identifying moths…and having a “mothing” event.

Wednesday’s Moth: National Moth Week 2017

(c) Tom Murray

Our National Moth Week species of the day is shown here in its caterpillar form. Meet the Goldenrod Hooded Owlet (Cucullia asteroides)!

The closest public event during National Moth Week to our city is at the South Shore Nature Center, this afternoon (Wed. July 27th). But check out this guide to finding moths.

All of our moth images this week are photographs shot in Cambridge. The image here was photographed at Fresh Pond Reservation by Tom Murray, author of Insects of New England and New York.

When you’re out looking for moths this week, include caterpillars. You can post a photo of it on iNaturalist.org or bugguide.net and ask for identification help.

A woman uses a long pole reaching from a bridge into the water on a snowy day.


A Victory for Clean Water: Citizen Science Data Leads to Change

The following news is reprinted with permission from the Mystic River Watershed Association:

For years, the Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA) and its volunteers have helped to document water pollution problems in the Town of Belmont. This week, that hard work paid off.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued an Administrative Order on Consent with the Town of Belmont over years of water quality damages. Over the next five years the town has agreed to make a significant investment in repairs to its storm water system, which is discharging pollutants, including human sewage, into waters of the Mystic River watershed. We congratulate Belmont on their commitment to improve water quality to tributaries to Alewife Brook.

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This is a success story for citizen science and for non-profit environmental collaboration with government agencies. Data acquired by MyRWA volunteers and shared with EPA was key to making progress. This has been a group effort—from the dozens of volunteer monitors who go out each month to collect samples, to the tireless work of others like Roger Frymire, who spent countless hours finding sources of pollution in the Alewife Brook area.

Since 2000, volunteers through the MyRWA’s Baseline Monitoring Program have generated water quality data that is shared with state and federal agencies. Each year the EPA in conjunction with MyRWA issues a water quality report card for the Mystic River watershed.
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The 2015 water quality report card for the Belmont area tells the story: Alewife Brook earned a D grade with 50% compliance with boating and swimming standards for bacteria; Little River a D- grade at 44% compliance; and Winn’s Brook an F grade at 33% compliance.

One powerful aspect of the Baseline Monitoring Program is that it is poised to document success as well as problems. As infrastructure repairs are made in Belmont, we fully expect these grades to improve. We look forward to documenting and celebrating water quality improvements to Alewife Brook, Little River, Winn’s Brook, Wellington Brook—and the Mystic River itself—over the next five years!

Congratulations and thanks to everyone who continues to work with us for protecting clean water.